Crinum macowanii

Crinum macowanii

The name Crinum originates from the Greek Krinon, which means white lily. As most species have white or whitish flowers the name seems especially appropriate.

 

Crinum are herbaceous plants with large, tunicated bulbs which produce a neck or a pseudostem made up of the sheathing bases of the old leaves. The leaves are linear to sword-shaped, sheathing at the base, arranged in a rosette or rarely in two opposite rows, often dying back in winter, usually with the previous season’s leaves growing out again in spring with a few new leaves in the middle.

 

The inflorescences arise laterally on a long, solid peduncle (main or inflorescence stalk) and are umbellate (flower stalks radiate from one central point), with two spathe valves (bracts) and one to many flowers. The flowers have short or long stalks with a long perianth tube and linear to broadly lanceolate segments that are spreading or held together in a trumpet shape. The stamens are either curved, ascending or angled downwards. The ovary appears as a swelling between the flower stalk and the tube.

Aloe fosteri

Aloe fosteri

Dark green with variation from grey to bluish; the leaves tend to become red in the dry winter with the tips dry; in summer they grow fuller to a 1 m wide rosette; teeth occur only on the edges; spots on the upper surface are H-shaped and may be accompanied by lines from the base to the apex; the lines also occur on the lower surface, but no spots and the colour here is light green.

Aloe cooperi

Aloe cooperi

Aloe cooperi is a South African grassland aloe. It was discovered by Burchell in his early travels in South Africa and was rediscovered by Thomas Cooper, after whom it was named. It occurs in moist habitats and in dry rocky areas, mainly in Natal, Swaziland and Mpumalanga. Aloe cooperi grows singly or in small groups from offshoots at ground level. Plants may be stemless or short stemmed up to 15cm high. The leaves are often yellowish green with the upper surface usually unspotted, though occasionally they have a few white spots lower down. The inflorescence is simple and bold. The flowers of Aloe cooperi vary in colour from greenish-cream to apricot and salmon pink.

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